Posts Tagged ‘God’s Sovereignty’

It’s been several months since I have written a blog, so some of you may be wondering, “What happened to Ken? What’s he been doing?” question_mark_emoji_png_1126325I’m sure most people don’t really care, but I thought it might be a good idea to return to the blog and hope that I can return to writing more consistently.

The main reason that I have not written in a while is that I have found little extra time in my packed schedule. The Lord continues to assign responsibilities to me that bring great joy to our lives. The role as transitional pastor at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Hammond, continues to offer both challenge and fulfillment. We have seen the Lord work in the lives of so many of the people in that church. We just completed a very successful Vacation Bible School where we saw six children give their lives to Christ. Serving on the state board of Child Evangelism Fellowship has offered me additional opportunities to grow, including to help establish the Northshore Chapter of CEF earlier this year.

The Lord has permitted to serve on the board of trustees of Louisiana College for the past seven years. During this final year of my tenure, I have had the privilege of serving as the board chairman. Getting to work with President Rick Brewer in this way has increased my appreciation for this great school.

In March Curtis Honts contacted me about writing a series of Sunday School lessons for LifeWay. I have written several times for him, so I knew what he would expect. However, I did not expect the deadlines would fall so close together. His offer came about the same time I was offered a long-term substitute teaching position at Fontainebleau Junior High School. These last two opportunities contributed greatly to the unexpected sabbatical from blogging. By the grace of God, I met all six writing deadlines for LifeWay. (Those lessons will be studied beginning next March.) Also by the grace of God, I finished the year out strong teaching junior high science and found that this might be the next avenue of my life ministry.

By the end of March, I had also completed the steps necessary to attend the job fair for new teachers in our parish (county for the rest of states). I interviewed for several teaching positions in junior high schools and high schools. Yesterday I was offered the position at Fontainebleau Junior High where I had worked as the long-term substitute.

Gayla and I are thankful to the Lord for the path on which He has led us and continues to lead us. During our 44 years of marriage, we have gone to college and seminary (two degrees), and served as the pastor of four churches in Texas and Louisiana. These experiences have positioned us to continue giving in the variety of ways mentioned above. The junior high now becomes another field of service in which we will serve as we serve in His work as a transitional pastor. To God be the glory!

Solomon had much to say about worldly treasure. Here are a few verses from Ecclesiastes:  

The one who loves silver is never satisfied with silver, and whoever loves wealth is never satisfied with income. This too is futile. 11 When good things increase, the ones who consume them multiply; what, then, is the profit to the owner, except to gaze at them with his eyes? 12 The sleep of the worker is sweet, whether he eats little or much, but the abundance of the rich permits him no sleep (Ecclesiastes 5:10-12, CSB).

 

People are continually searching for the treasure of true life and joy and love. Jesus Christ promised that He was that treasure. Any other treasure will lead you astray. This still doesn’t stop people from searching in the wrong places for what they believe will bring them joy.

Somewhere in the Rocky Mountains, there’s a bronze chest filled with gold and precious gems. The search for this hidden treasure has become a hobby for some, an obsession for others, and for one recent searcher — a fatal pursuit.

Last summer, 53-year-old Jeff Murphy was hiking in Yellowstone National Park when he disappeared. Park investigators found his body on June 9, where Murphy had fallen 500 feet from Turkey Pen Peak, after accidentally stepping into a chute.

The man behind the treasure is Forrest Fenn, an 86-year-old millionaire, former Vietnam fighter pilot, self-taught archaeologist, and successful art dealer in Santa Fe, New Mexico. “No one knows where that treasure chest is but me,” Fenn says. “If I die tomorrow, the knowledge of that location goes in the coffin with me.”

“The ornate, Romanesque box is 10-by-10 inches and weighs about 40 pounds when loaded,” NPR’s John Burnett reported in 2016. “Fenn has only revealed that it is hidden in the Rocky Mountains, somewhere between Santa Fe and the Canadian border at an elevation above 5,000 feet. It’s not in a mine, a graveyard, or near a structure.” For further clues, you have to read the poem in his self-published book, The Thrill of the Chase.

Here’s one stanza:

Begin it where warm waters halt

And take it in the canyon down,

Not far, but too far to walk.

Put in below the home of Brown.

So far tens of thousands of people have reportedly gone looking for Fenn’s treasure, thought to be worth well over a million dollars. Murphy is the fourth man to die while searching for the chest.

Solomon concluded Ecclesiastes 5 with a word towards focusing on God who brings us satisfying joy:

Here is what I have seen to be good: It is appropriate to eat, drink, and experience good in all the labor one does under the sun during the few days of his life God has given him, because that is his reward. 19 Furthermore, everyone to whom God has given riches and wealth, he has also allowed him to enjoy them, take his reward, and rejoice in his labor. This is a gift of God, 20 for he does not often consider the days of his life because God keeps him occupied with the joy of his heart (Ecclesiastes 5:18-20, CSB).

Why not spend your efforts finding and enjoying the real treasure found in a relationship with Jesus Christ?

bushThe story of Moses’ call has always interested me. Recently the Lord drove me to take a fresh look at how God works in our lives — often without our realizing how intricately He engages into every aspect of our days. While God is always up to something, it’s not His way to explain Himself other than to record in His Word so that we learn from Him. We can certainly agree with what Isaiah the prophet said about God, “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, and your ways are not my ways” (Isaiah 55:8).

As the book of Exodus opens, it appears that God has forgotten Israel and His promises to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. Egypt has enslaved Israel and has held them in bondage and treated them harshly for more than 350 years. Because Israel had increased in number and because the Egyptian king feared that Israel might join Egypt’s enemies, the king ordered the execution of all Hebrew boy babies by throwing them into the Nile River. One Hebrew mother hid her son for three months until she placed a floating basket which carried her son into the river. The Egyptian king’s daughter rescued the baby, and the baby’s sister suggested that she could find a Hebrew woman to nurse him. In this way, the baby’s own mother would be the chief influencer of that baby for first few years of his life.

As Moses grew up in the household of the Egyptian king, he was afforded all the best of Egypt. However, the early nurturing of his mother took hold. Moses would come to identify with his people. When he came to the rescue of a Hebrew slave who was being beaten by his Egyptian taskmaster, Moses killed the Egyptian. A couple of days later, Moses fled Egypt fearing for his own life.

Exodus 2 closes with Moses gone from Egypt and caring for sheep in Midian while the Israelites still suffered the hardship of slavery. While the text of Exodus gives no time frame, Deacon Stephen does in Acts 7. In his testimony in his trial, Stephen noted that Moses was 40 when he identified with his own people and that it was another 40 years when he had the encounter with the burning bush. There’s no other record of what Moses may have been doing other than the ordinary day-to-day work of caring for sheep and providing for his family. In other words, it would appear that God had forgotten His people in Egypt. But we would do well remember that God doesn’t get in our kind of hurry.

The day that God showed up in the form of a burning bush on the side of mountain, Moses was caring for Jethro’s sheep. God took the initiative. Moses was minding his own business and had been doing to for 40 years when God summoned him to come up to Mount Horeb.

This week I read the account of J.P. Lowery of Mount Pleasant, Texas, who had recently celebrated his 100th birthday. What got my attention was the headline in the Southern Baptist Texan: “100-year old Sunday School Teacher Began Ministering at 60.” Born in Mississippi, Lowery was just 5 years old when his father died. His mother provided for the family sharecropping until he was 14 when the family moved to a farm in West Texas. They didn’t live near a church, but they did go to Sunday School in a two-room schoolhouse where he attended school. After serving in the Army in the late 40s, Lowery returned home. He worked as a police officer and had an electronics repair business. He and his wife moved to Mount Pleasant after visiting his sister there in the late 50s.

Lowery commented, “I was living a pretty good life but I needed to become a Christian.” It wasn’t until he had a talk with the pastor of First Baptist Church of Cookville that he realized he was lost. “I had lived all those 41 years and thought I was a pretty good guy. The Holy Spirit got ahold of me and made me realize I was going to hell if I didn’t change my ways.”

It sounds to me, like Moses, J.P. Lowery was minding his own business when God showed up in his life and invited him to have a relationship with Him. Lowery concluded, “You know, if God wants you to do something, He’ll manage for you to do it and that’s the way it happened for me.”

This week I attended a pastors’ conference that encouraged me greatly. Greg Gilbert, who serves as the senior pastor of Third Avenue Baptist Church in Louisville, led the conference. The Lord used Greg to speak into my heart from the story of Joseph in Genesis 37-50. He noted that this story was not as much about Joseph as it was about God. When I told Gayla about it, she said, “The story of Joseph has always been one of my favorites because of what God did in Joseph’s life.”

I’d like to share the lessons I learned from Joseph. The main idea of the narrative is that whatever your circumstances remember that God has a purpose for it all even if it is not what you want or expect. With my recent experience of having stepped down as pastor of my church, I can assure you that these words resonated with me with particular power. Greg offered five points of application from Joseph’s life.

First, whatever circumstances you find yourself in, remember that you work for the Lord. Joseph worked for several different people — his father, Potiphar, the chief jailer, Pharaoh. But he really worked for God no matter who his earthly boss may have been. Problems can come in our ministry when we make an idol of our ministry. It’s easy to fall into a trap of believing everything revolves around us. You can begin to believe that you deserve certain things. Problems can also come when you become idle in the heart. You must keep the spiritual fire alive by washing yourself in the Word. You cannot continue to work effectively for the Lord without His strengthening.

Second, remember that God is sovereign over every detail of your life. Joseph knew that God allowed all the things to happen to him. The dreams of Genesis 37 reveal the end of the story, but they aren’t there to kill the plot. God was “calling His shot” (kind of like Babe Ruth calling his famous home run). Joseph delivered the clinching line, “You meant evil against me, but God meant it for good” (Gen. 50:20).  You need to learn to rest in God’s sovereignty. There’s nothing that happens without God’s ordination and permission. God rules without exception. (Boy, did I needed that!)

Third, because God is sovereign you need to work hard to develop a patient quiet trust in God. Joseph had a remarkable confidence in God. He doesn’t know what is going to happen, but continued to be confident. Consider his resolve even after being thrown into the pit by his brothers. Consider his resolve even after two plus years in the prison. What a great model! It would have been so easy to give up on God. You need to remember that God’s providence is longer than your life.

Fourth, whatever your circumstances, learn to be joyful and serve well where you are placed. Wherever Joseph served, he served his master well. There was no indication that he complained — even when he was falsely accused or forgotten in the prison. When I left my last church, I determined that the Lord was not finished with me and that I would still serve Him. God has faithfully provided opportunities for me to preach or teach.

Fifth, leave the results to God. To be sure, some of the preaching opportunities have been humbling, but I have rejoiced in knowing that He knows where I am and that He has appointed these opportunities for me. I also remain confident that He has a more permanent assignment for me in the future. Therefore, I will work faithfully for Him through this present period in my ministry. Taking Joseph as my example, I will not attempt to wrangle circumstances for my advantage.

As Greg concluded his talk, he took time to observe how irrelevant Joseph is for the rest of the Bible. Although Moses focused on his story from Genesis 37-50, Joseph barely gets mentioned for the rest of the Bible. He was so important in Genesis — Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph — the patriarchs. But in Matthew, the record says, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Judah. What a shocker! But this only underscores that God does what He wants — not what we want or expect. God is sovereign; therefore, we would do well to leave the results to God.

Here’s what I think God wants us to get: He is so unpredictable because He wants us to cling to Him.

 

On November 5, 2014, a woman named, Gigi Jordan was declared guilty of killing her 8-year old son who had autism. Her defense attorney said her act could only be described as a mercy killing.

How could this be? Gigi Jordan said her ex-husband had threatened her life; therefore, she did not want Jude, her 8-year old son to fall into the hands of his biological father. This woman, a multi-millionaire, declared that she loved her son so much that she could not bear the thought of him living without her, Therefore, she poisoned her son and killed him.

For her crime, Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Charles Simpson issued a stiff sentence — 18 years in prison. Simpson commented, “You would think in 2015, the defendant would say something like, ‘What a terrible thing I did. How could I kill my own son?'”

This kind of twisted thinking in our culture today, demeans the purpose of each person who lives.  It places one person over another, as one having a purpose and a destiny, while another does not. This is what happens when a culture for the almost 45 years has aborted more than 60 million babies, an entire generation. sanctity-of-life

I declare in Jesus’ name today that every baby and every child and every teenager and every adult has a purpose for their lives. Whether they are healthy or whether they face struggles like Down’s Syndrome or autism or whatever other birth defect, every life has a purpose under God. God has a purpose for every life.

Because I live in Louisiana, I will offer some statistics from that perspective. Even so, I am sure that similar statistics could be offered for the other forty-nine states. As is the case in the United States as a whole, suicide rates are on the rise in Louisiana. According to the American Society for Suicide Prevention, suicide is the 11th leading cause of death in Louisiana, and was responsible for 679 deaths in 2016.  This figure puts the suicide rate in Louisiana above the national average. To put this data into perspective, this rate means that, on average, one person dies every 13 hours from suicide in Louisiana.  Sadly, it appears that loss of life from suicide is a particular risk for young people, with suicide representing the third leading cause of death for Louisianans ages 15-34. To be sure, we have a mental health crisis.

Listen to me today, whether a person has mental health challenges (according to research one out of four Americans has some sort of challenge) or people are completely healthy in every way, I declare in Jesus’ name, God has a purpose for their life. Human life is not in the hands of men, but in the hands of God.

We do not have the right to take innocent life. Whether this takes place in a fit of rage or under the approval of the courts through upholding abortion procedures, no one has the ultimate right to live and act in a way contrary to the dictates of God’s revealed truth.

 

 

In an interview with Cindy Pearlman published in The Chicago Sun Times (October 13, 2014), actor Bill Murray claimed that a work of art once saved his life. He was in Chicago for his first experience as an actor. He thought that his first performance had gone so badly that he just walked out afterward and onto the street. He kept walking for a couple of hours. Then he realized that he walked in the wrong direction and not in just the wrong direction from where he lived, but in the desire to stay alive.

He headed for Lake Michigan as he contemplated taking his own life. Murray continued:

“I thought: ‘If I’m going to die, I might as well go over toward the lake and float a bit.’ So, I walked toward the lake and reached Michigan Avenue and started walking north. Somehow I ended up in front of the Art Institute and walked inside. the-song-of-the-lark-1884.jpg!LargeThere was a painting of a woman working in a field with a sunrise behind her. I always loved that painting. I saw it that night and said, ‘Look, there’s a girl without a whole lot of prospects, but the sun’s coming up and she’s got another chance at it.'”

The painting, “Song of a Lark” by Jules Breton, helped mend Murray’s heart. After gazing at the painting, Murray decided to live and said, “I’m a person, too, and will get another chance every single day.”

When Peter addressed “the exiles dispersed abroad” throughout five Roman provinces (see 1 Peter 1:1), he wrote to encourage them as they faced uncertainty due to persecution. Having been forced to leave their homes, their jobs, their friends, their way of life, these believers needed exactly what Peter offered — encouragement to remain faithful and strong in the Lord.

That encouragement remains intact for believers today! God has given each believer a new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. This new birth comes with an inheritance that is untouched by death, unstained by evil, and unimpaired by time. Furthermore what God has given to the believer is being guarded by God’s power. Not only that, but the fullness of our eternal salvation is ready now to be revealed when He returns (see 1 Peter 3-5).

You have every reason to live for today because God has your today and forever covered.

 

Anyone who knows me well also knows that I was not the best science student. In fact, because of my limited grasp on textbook science, I managed to earn an undergraduate degree with only one science course! However, this has not kept me from appreciating the connections from science when I study God’s Word.

I’m hoping to continue preaching as many Sundays as possible while I am in this “in between” ministries phase. So each week I prepare as if I will be preaching. It keeps me sharp and focused on my calling as a pastor-teacher. The Lord has led me to prepare to preach from 1 Peter, and I discovered a great connection between science and the audience Peter addressed.

Dr. James Clark, is a professor of Geology at Wheaton College in Chicago. He recounted a visit to the Soviet Union a few years after Communism dissolved. Though not a preacher, Dr. Clark was asked to preach at a small Russian Baptist church that lived through a long season of persecution. Some in the congregation had been in prison because of their testimony in Christ. Others had husbands or relatives that had suffered or had even been killed for their faith.

In order to connect with his audience, Dr. Clark decided to use a geological illustration — one dealing with metamorphic rocks. Clark said: 

“Clay is actually composed of many microscopic clay mineral crystals, which not even a light microscope can see. But under pressure the clay minerals are not crushed or made smaller. Rather, they grow larger. The minerals change into new larger biotype grains forming slate, found on many homes. With even more pressure, the minerals become even larger. And some are transformed into garnets, which are semi-precious gems.”slate

Dr. Clark explained to the congregation that this geological process illustrates how pressure and suffering can be used to refine, purify, and mold a person into a more beautiful soul. He said that he will never forget what he saw when he looked at the congregation. It seemed like the whole congregation was sparkling. The old women’s eyes were gleaming bright with tears recalling past suffering.

stauroliteDr. Clark continued, “What makes a gem so attractive? It’s the reflection. These dear women and men were reflecting God’s glory through the suffering they had endured. But there’s more: With even more pressure applied, a new mineral forms called staurolite. The name is from two Greek words meaning “stone cross.” The twin variety forms deep under high mountains in the shape of a cross. A reminder of Christ’s ultimate suffering for us all.”

Peter wrote his epistle for two clear reasons. First, Peter wanted to challenge and strengthen believers to stand against the onslaught of persecution being leveled against them. Peter also wanted to reinforce the truth that believers have an eternal home and that we are merely passing through this time on the earth. Peter’s audience was hurting and suffering from ridicule and persecution. They had been forced to leave everything behind: homes, property, estates, businesses, jobs, money, church, friends, and fellow believers. Now scattered to five Roman provinces, Peter urged them to continue as an underground church.

Imagine the fear, uncertainty, and insecurity. They lived each day looking over their shoulders. Their stress-filled lives included restlessness, sleeplessness, anxiety, uncertainty, and insecurity. Their hearts pounded at the slightest shadow or noise.

These believers needed strong encouragement. Peter’s words would have helped them immensely to know that God had not forgotten them but was bringing about a strengthening of their faith in Christ.