Posts Tagged ‘Enouragement’

Little Church

After serving as a pastor of a local church for thirty-five years and now having stepped down from the pastorate of my last church, my wife and I have experienced  a different perspective about the local church. Most people choose a church based on the quality of the services or the power in the pulpit or the size of the membership.

After we resigned, we sought the Lord’s guidance for a church to call our “home church.” This was a new and awkward experience for us because the last four churches we called our church came automatically to us as we accepted the call to be the pastor. The awkwardness continued as the Lord gave us several opportunities to preach for churches for the first several weeks. The church we joined has welcomed us and loved us. The pastor and his wife, the deacons, and members reached out to us when we needed it. They have prayed for us and and have encouraged us. We found that the most important ingredient to finding the right church was not really the dynamism of the leaders but the devotion of the people. The church the Lord led us to join is what most people would call a “small church.” But we think this church has a big heart.

Last week Gayla and I attended the midweek service at one of the churches where I have preached a couple of times recently. We needed to meet with one of the members there about a property transaction with our local Baptist association. We arrived just as the service was beginning. (We had underestimated the amount of time it would take to get to this little country church.) We joined a small group of attenders — my wife and I increased their attendance to a dozen souls. Since we had been with these people before, they stopped and greeted us before they continued with the lesson.

Since we had planned to go home afterwards to eat a light supper, we were a bit hungry. My hunger only increased as the aroma of a wonderful meal that I supposed had been enjoyed before the service began. However to my surprise when the service ended, there was an immediate insistence, “You both will be staying for supper!”

While not wanting to be a burden on the small gathering, we succumbed to their urging. And we were glad we did. Not that the meal was anything special, the fellowship around the table with believers we barely knew was especially sweet. There’s just something about communing the body of Christ.

If you’re not a member of a local body of believers, you’re missing out on a big blessing. And don’t judge the size of your blessing on the size of the congregation. God becomes so real when He comes from the hearts of His people.

Advertisements

Firefighters in the Los Angeles Fire Department found a creative way to find and rescue a lost teenager. When thirteen-year-old Jesse Hernandez plunged 25 feet into a four-foot-wide sewer pipe after walking on some wooden planks in an abandoned building, rescuers turned to a superhero-inspired solution to help locate the young boy. rescue

The search, which lasted 13 hours, was a race against time as survivability diminishes in that toxic environment according to Erik Scott with the Los Angeles Fire Department (LAFD). More than 100 firefighters searched 2,400 feet of pipe in a maze of a sewer system that has different depths of water moving at around 15 miles per hour.

Since the hazardous environment prevented crews from wading in directly, firefighters strapped a camera to a flotation device, and used its signal along with other “Batman-like tools” to track the boy’s location, identifying the handprints he left on the pipe walls along the way.

Rescuers found Hernandez a mile east of where he accidentally entered the sewer pipe. After the rescue, LAFD personnel gave him a cell phone to call his parents, obviously quite relieved.

I love that the LAFD found a creative way to find and rescue Hernandez. But I am forever grateful that the Creator of the Universe sent His one and only Son into the hazardous environment of our sin-filled world. Through the life, death, resurrection, and saving power of Jesus Christ, we can be rescued forever.

At a June 13, 2008, event honoring John Wooden and famed sportscaster Vin Scully and raising money for pediatric cancer research at UCLA and other local institutions, Coach Wooden had an opportunity to demonstrate his famed socks-and-shoes lessons.

Wooden began the first day of practice each year with his most important basketball lesson. Players gathering for that first day  were full of anticipation. They wondered how their coach would set the tone for the long season to come. They didn’t have to wait long. Socks

At the event one of Wooden’s most famous players, Bill Walton, introduced the coach and recalled his first days at UCLA as a basketball player. Walton related the shock that he and other new players felt when the first thing Wooden did was set them down and teach them how to put on their shoes and socks. Doing this properly, Walton said, was the initial lesson for “everything we would need to know for the rest of our lives.”

Following Walton’s introduction, Coach Wooden came out on stage holding a box with athletic shoes and socks, bringing with him 12-year-old Robert, who was introduced as having tackled cancer at Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA. There was much good-natured laughter as Wooden gave Robert the socks-and-shoes instructions.

“You know, basketball is a game that’s played on a hardwood floor,” Wooden said. “And to be good, you have to…change your direction, change your pace. That’s hard on your feet. Your feet are very important.”

The team veterans knew this lesson was coming at the first practice, but  first year players were no doubt perplexed by the initial lesson imparted by their Hall of Fame coach: He taught them how to put on a pair of socks. He did not teach this lesson only once, but before every game and practice. Why?

Wooden had discovered many players didn’t properly smooth out wrinkles in the socks around their heels and little toes. If left uncorrected, these wrinkles could cause blisters that could hamper their performance at crucial times during games. Many players thought the practice odd and laughed about it then. Wooden knows some of them still laugh about it today. But the coach would not compromise on this basic fundamental principle: “I stuck to it. I believed in that, and I insisted on it.”

In our desire to grow as Christians, we can easily forget about the fundamentals of our faith. If we do, we run the risk of developing painful spiritual blisters that can hurt us as we run our race.

 

After a long night and day of marching, General Robert E. Lee and the exhausted Army of Northern Virginia made camp just east of Appomattox Courthouse on April 8, 1865. Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant had sent him a letter on the night of April 7, following confrontations between their troops at Cumberland Church and Farmville, suggesting Lee surrender. Lee refused. Grant replied, again suggesting surrender to end the bloodshed. Lee responded, saying in part, “I do not think that emergency has arisen to call for the surrender of this army,” though he offered to meet Grant at 10 the next morning between picket lines to discuss a peaceful outcome.

In planning for the next day, Lee informed his men that he would ignore the surrender request and attempt to fend off General Philip Sheridan’s cavalry while at least part of the Army of Northern Virginia moved on toward Lynchburg — assuming the main Union force was just calvary. However, Major General George G. Meade’s VI and II Corps pursued the greatly outnumbered Confederate troops.

Having watched the battle through field glasses, Lee said, “There is nothing left for me to do but go and see General Grant, and I would rather die a thousand deaths.” Having dressed that morning in his finest dress uniform, Lee rode to the spot where he thought he and Grant would meet between the picket lines for peace talks only to receive a message of Grant’s refusal to meet.

Lee quickly wrote a reply, indicating that he was now ready to surrender. Still hearing the sounds of fighting, Lee sent a letter to Meade requesting an immediate truce along the lines. Meade replied that he was not in communication with Grant but would send the message on and also suggest Lee send another letter to Grant via Sheridan. Lee also had Confederate Major General John B. Gordon place flags of truce along the line. As the messages moved through the lines and word of the surrender spread, the fighting stopped.

Grant received Lee’s letter of surrender just before noon. In his reply, Grant asked Lee to select a meeting place. In searching for a suitable place, Lee and his men encountered Wilmer McLean, who offered his own home for the meeting. Grant arrived in Appomattox about 1:30 in the afternoon and proceeded to the McLean house. His appearance in his field uniform, muddy after his long ride, contrasted sharply with Lee’s clean dress uniform. They chatted for a while before discussing and writing up the terms of the surrender.

The terms were surprising. It wasn’t judgment — nor prison — nor retribution. The terms were to stop fighting and to start living. Give up your weapons, go home, and plant your fields. The soldiers who had not eaten in days were given meal rations. Their horses and mules returned to plowing fields. The war was over but for many people, life had just begun.

A kind word can turn away wrath. Good things happen when we can weep with those who weep. Acting like Jesus sometimes means seeing past someone’s behavior and into their need.

If you’ve been hurt, the best next step for you is to forgive that person. Holding onto the hurt will only make the hurt worse.

In an interview with Cindy Pearlman published in The Chicago Sun Times (October 13, 2014), actor Bill Murray claimed that a work of art once saved his life. He was in Chicago for his first experience as an actor. He thought that his first performance had gone so badly that he just walked out afterward and onto the street. He kept walking for a couple of hours. Then he realized that he walked in the wrong direction and not in just the wrong direction from where he lived, but in the desire to stay alive.

He headed for Lake Michigan as he contemplated taking his own life. Murray continued:

“I thought: ‘If I’m going to die, I might as well go over toward the lake and float a bit.’ So, I walked toward the lake and reached Michigan Avenue and started walking north. Somehow I ended up in front of the Art Institute and walked inside. the-song-of-the-lark-1884.jpg!LargeThere was a painting of a woman working in a field with a sunrise behind her. I always loved that painting. I saw it that night and said, ‘Look, there’s a girl without a whole lot of prospects, but the sun’s coming up and she’s got another chance at it.'”

The painting, “Song of a Lark” by Jules Breton, helped mend Murray’s heart. After gazing at the painting, Murray decided to live and said, “I’m a person, too, and will get another chance every single day.”

When Peter addressed “the exiles dispersed abroad” throughout five Roman provinces (see 1 Peter 1:1), he wrote to encourage them as they faced uncertainty due to persecution. Having been forced to leave their homes, their jobs, their friends, their way of life, these believers needed exactly what Peter offered — encouragement to remain faithful and strong in the Lord.

That encouragement remains intact for believers today! God has given each believer a new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. This new birth comes with an inheritance that is untouched by death, unstained by evil, and unimpaired by time. Furthermore what God has given to the believer is being guarded by God’s power. Not only that, but the fullness of our eternal salvation is ready now to be revealed when He returns (see 1 Peter 3-5).

You have every reason to live for today because God has your today and forever covered.

 

After returning home from a long tour, Bono, the lead singer for U2, returned to Dublin and attended a Christmas Eve service. At some point in that service, Bono grasped the truth at the heart of the Christmas story: in Jesus, God became a human being. With tears streaming down his face, Bono realized,Bono_board_photo-360x360

“The idea that God, if there is a force of Love and Logic in the universe, that it would seek to explain itself is amazing enough. That it would seek to explain itself by becoming a child born in poverty…and straw, a child, I just thought, ‘Wow!’ Just the poetry…I saw the genius of picking a particular point in time and deciding to turn on this…Love needs to find a form, intimacy needs to be whispered…Love has to become an action or something concrete. It would have to happen. There must be an incarnation. Love must be made flesh.” *

The prophecy of the promised Messiah of Luke’s first chapter finds its fulfillment in the second chapter. Three key words — providence, promise, and praise — offer markers for us in Luke 2:1-20.

In the providence of God’s design, God chose for His Son to become flesh during the reign of Caesar Augustus. Luke wanted his readers to note the census, since he mentioned it four times. The census happened at just the right time and in the right way. Providence is God’s guidance and care in your life. He is continually involved in your life, just as He was involved in the exactness of the details of the birth of Messiah. We should note that Messiah came according to God’s timing. “But when the fullness of time had come, God sent forth his Son, born of woman, born under the law, to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as sons” (Galatians 4:4-5). We should also note that He was born exactly where God had said the Messiah would be born — Bethlehem. And when it came time for the baby to be born, He came God’s way and was wrapped in swaddling clothes and was laid in the “feeding trough” of an animal. God’s way was for His Son’s humble life on earth to begin in this way.

God is at work in your life and has every moment planned for you. You can trust that His ways are always better than your ways.

An angel made an unbelievable appearance to some shepherds. In the eyes of many, an angel would never appear to a shepherd. Shepherds would seldom be found praising and worshiping God. I find it ironic that those who kept flocks of sheep (keep in mind that some of these sheep may have been destined for the altar as sacrifices for worship) would have been considered unclean and therefore unworthy to worship God.

The angel delivered to the shepherds God’s promise. “Don’t be afraid! I proclaim to you good news of great joy that will be for ALL people.” Jesus came for all people. Jesus came to be our Savior. He will deliver you from your sin. He is the anointed One — the Messiah. He is the Lord, the supreme authority over all.

A large number of angels — too many to count — gathered in the nighttime sky to declare with Gabriel praise to God. And when the angels departed, the shepherds discussed what they had just heard and determined that they had to go at once to Bethlehem. They wanted to see for themselves what the angels had declared to them. They found Jesus, just as the angel said they would, lying in a feeding trough with Mary and Joseph nearby.

As they left to return to their flocks, they shared the report the angel had told them about the baby. They essentially took the place of the angels as they humbly returned to their duties. Telling others about the Savior is a solemn obligation as well as a great privilege, and we who are believers must be faithful.

* Quoted in Matt Woodley, The Gospel of Matthew: God With Us (InterVarsity Press, 2011), p. 28-29

Whether you believe it or not, whether you accept it or not, God has placed within your heart eternity. He has wired you to want to know Him. The writer of Ecclesiastes says, “He has made everything beautiful in its time. Also, he has put eternity into man’s heart” (Eccl. 3:11, ESV).  This makes people different and more valuable than every other living thing. People are not like animals that live and die and give no thought to what will happen in another life. We human beings ponder and lose sleep over what will become of us after death. That’s because God has made us for eternity. He created us for a greater purpose, a greater objective, not just for this life, but for what comes after this life.

This fact sets us apart from animals. This is what gives meaning to life. People were not made only for this existence on the earth. No, we were made by our Creator for eternity, and He has planted that into our hearts.

Recently I learned about an amazing bird that illustrates from nature what our Creator Bar-tailed_Godwithas implanted in us. There’s a small bird that grows up in northern Alaska called the bar-tailed godwit. The godwit has no outstanding outer characteristics. They have no extraordinary markings and they seem so ordinarily colored in mottled brown, black, and gray. They almost seem to blend into the water scene along the shore as just another bird that you see along the water.

But every fall flocks of bar-tailed godwits fly about 7,000 miles to New Zealand. When the young birds mature and start to migrate, something wired in them also directs them to New Zealand. Though they are land birds, and cannot fish or rest on the sea, they will cross most of the Pacific Ocean, and fly all the way to New Zealand. Many of them are young, and have never done this before.

How they do that, many of them never having been in the southern hemisphere, never having seen the southern stars, nobody seems to know. But they manage. One female, dubbed E7, because that was the code on her wireless transmitter, flew 11,680 kilometers (7,369 miles) in 8.1 days. Non-stop. The same homing signal that guides them over treacherous waters to New Zealand also navigates them back to their parents.

God has created the bar-tailed godwit with New Zealand in their hearts. Similarly, God has created within us “homing signals” for God and eternity. He has put eternity in our hearts. Our desire to live and our longing for something beyond this life comes from the One who loves you and wants you to spend eternity with Him.