Archive for the ‘Stories’ Category

Solomon had much to say about worldly treasure. Here are a few verses from Ecclesiastes:  

The one who loves silver is never satisfied with silver, and whoever loves wealth is never satisfied with income. This too is futile. 11 When good things increase, the ones who consume them multiply; what, then, is the profit to the owner, except to gaze at them with his eyes? 12 The sleep of the worker is sweet, whether he eats little or much, but the abundance of the rich permits him no sleep (Ecclesiastes 5:10-12, CSB).

 

People are continually searching for the treasure of true life and joy and love. Jesus Christ promised that He was that treasure. Any other treasure will lead you astray. This still doesn’t stop people from searching in the wrong places for what they believe will bring them joy.

Somewhere in the Rocky Mountains, there’s a bronze chest filled with gold and precious gems. The search for this hidden treasure has become a hobby for some, an obsession for others, and for one recent searcher — a fatal pursuit.

Last summer, 53-year-old Jeff Murphy was hiking in Yellowstone National Park when he disappeared. Park investigators found his body on June 9, where Murphy had fallen 500 feet from Turkey Pen Peak, after accidentally stepping into a chute.

The man behind the treasure is Forrest Fenn, an 86-year-old millionaire, former Vietnam fighter pilot, self-taught archaeologist, and successful art dealer in Santa Fe, New Mexico. “No one knows where that treasure chest is but me,” Fenn says. “If I die tomorrow, the knowledge of that location goes in the coffin with me.”

“The ornate, Romanesque box is 10-by-10 inches and weighs about 40 pounds when loaded,” NPR’s John Burnett reported in 2016. “Fenn has only revealed that it is hidden in the Rocky Mountains, somewhere between Santa Fe and the Canadian border at an elevation above 5,000 feet. It’s not in a mine, a graveyard, or near a structure.” For further clues, you have to read the poem in his self-published book,¬†The Thrill of the Chase.

Here’s one stanza:

Begin it where warm waters halt

And take it in the canyon down,

Not far, but too far to walk.

Put in below the home of Brown.

So far tens of thousands of people have reportedly gone looking for Fenn’s treasure, thought to be worth well over a million dollars. Murphy is the fourth man to die while searching for the chest.

Solomon concluded Ecclesiastes 5 with a word towards focusing on God who brings us satisfying joy:

Here is what I have seen to be good: It is appropriate to eat, drink, and experience good in all the labor one does under the sun during the few days of his life God has given him, because that is his reward. 19 Furthermore, everyone to whom God has given riches and wealth, he has also allowed him to enjoy them, take his reward, and rejoice in his labor. This is a gift of God, 20 for he does not often consider the days of his life because God keeps him occupied with the joy of his heart (Ecclesiastes 5:18-20, CSB).

Why not spend your efforts finding and enjoying the real treasure found in a relationship with Jesus Christ?

soccerNothing can stop the world’s most dedicated sports fan from supporting his beloved team.

Ali Demirkaya, nicknamed¬† “Yamuk Ali” (or crazy Ali) by the Internet, is a soccer fan of the local soccer team in Denizlispor, Turkey. Ali, who had been banned from Denizli Atat√ľrk stadium for unspecified reasons, took the only reasonable course to watch the game. He rented a crane.¬†soccer fan

From high above just beyond the stadium limits, the diehard Denizlispor fan watched his team vanquish Gaziantepspor 5-0. He even led the crowd in a chant.

“That match was very important for our team,” he explained to Yeni Asir¬†newspaper. “I had to go to the police station to sign a paper to show that I am not watching the match in the stadium. Then I quickly went to rent the crane.” Social media in the area was full of pictures of a jubilant Ali cheering from his perch.

Ultimately, police were summoned and Ali was forced to lower the crane. Nevertheless, he still ended the day on a high note. The stunt only cost him the equivalent of $86, he wasn’t cited or fined by the authorities, and his team won 5-0.

How far would you go to get something you wanted? It will likely come down to how bad you want it. If it means something to you, you’ll get creative to make sure you don’t miss out. Sometimes God’s blessing comes to those willing to go to extremes.

God offers spiritual disciplines as the means to understand His heart and His will for our lives. The disciplines of prayer, meditating on His Word, and fasting are only some of them. Unfortunately, many believers think that the spiritual disciplines are extreme and only have to be used in dire circumstances. However, if you really want to know that heart of God, you’ll be more than willing to do whatever it takes.

bushThe story of Moses’ call has always interested me. Recently the Lord drove me to take a fresh look at how God works in our lives — often without our realizing how intricately He engages into every aspect of our days. While God is always up to something, it’s not His way to explain Himself other than to record in His Word so that we learn from Him. We can certainly agree with what Isaiah the prophet said about God, “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, and your ways are not my ways” (Isaiah 55:8).

As the book of Exodus opens, it appears that God has forgotten Israel and His promises to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. Egypt has enslaved Israel and has held them in bondage and treated them harshly for more than 350 years. Because Israel had increased in number and because the Egyptian king feared that Israel might join Egypt’s enemies, the king ordered the execution of all Hebrew boy babies by throwing them into the Nile River. One Hebrew mother hid her son for three months until she placed a floating basket which carried her son into the river. The Egyptian king’s daughter rescued the baby, and the baby’s sister suggested that she could find a Hebrew woman to nurse him. In this way, the baby’s own mother would be the chief influencer of that baby for first few years of his life.

As Moses grew up in the household of the Egyptian king, he was afforded all the best of Egypt. However, the early nurturing of his mother took hold. Moses would come to identify with his people. When he came to the rescue of a Hebrew slave who was being beaten by his Egyptian taskmaster, Moses killed the Egyptian. A couple of days later, Moses fled Egypt fearing for his own life.

Exodus 2 closes with Moses gone from Egypt and caring for sheep in Midian while the Israelites still suffered the hardship of slavery. While the text of Exodus gives no time frame, Deacon Stephen does in Acts 7. In his testimony in his trial, Stephen noted that Moses was 40 when he identified with his own people and that it was another 40 years when he had the encounter with the burning bush. There’s no other record of what Moses may have been doing other than the ordinary day-to-day work of caring for sheep and providing for his family. In other words, it would appear that God had forgotten His people in Egypt. But we would do well remember that God doesn’t get in our kind of hurry.

The day that God showed up in the form of a burning bush on the side of mountain, Moses was caring for Jethro’s sheep. God took the initiative. Moses was minding his own business and had been doing to for 40 years when God summoned him to come up to Mount Horeb.

This week I read the account of J.P. Lowery of Mount Pleasant, Texas, who had recently celebrated his 100th birthday. What got my attention was the headline in the Southern Baptist Texan: “100-year old Sunday School Teacher Began Ministering at 60.” Born in Mississippi, Lowery was just 5 years old when his father died. His mother provided for the family sharecropping until he was 14 when the family moved to a farm in West Texas. They didn’t live near a church, but they did go to Sunday School in a two-room schoolhouse where he attended school. After serving in the Army in the late 40s, Lowery returned home. He worked as a police officer and had an electronics repair business. He and his wife moved to Mount Pleasant after visiting his sister there in the late 50s.

Lowery commented, “I was living a pretty good life but I needed to become a Christian.” It wasn’t until he had a talk with the pastor of First Baptist Church of Cookville that he realized he was lost. “I had lived all those 41 years and thought I was a pretty good guy. The Holy Spirit got ahold of me and made me realize I was going to hell if I didn’t change my ways.”

It sounds to me, like Moses, J.P. Lowery was minding his own business when God showed up in his life and invited him to have a relationship with Him. Lowery concluded, “You know, if God wants you to do something, He’ll manage for you to do it and that’s the way it happened for me.”

Watch Your Mouth!

Posted: May 15, 2018 in Church, Gossip, Stories, Tongue
Tags: ,

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Recently it seems that I have either received or caused a number of pocket dials. You know, those times when your smartphone “reaches out and touches someone” at some awkward moment. Usually it’s someone you have recently called. For me that means it will be my wife, one of my children, my mother, or one of my brothers. At best such phone calls can be embarrassing–and at worst, it could cost you your job.

James Stephens discovered that a pocket dial late one evening cost him dearly. Stephens and his wife were at home one night complaining about his boss who overheard because James had pocket dialed him. The next day, James says he was given a choice: resign or be fired. He resigned. Now, he and his wife are suing, claiming that eavesdropping was illegal.

Stephens says that his former boss had a tendency to call him after hours quite a bit. After his boss called him at home late one night his wife Gina had something to say about the “intrusion.”¬† Unfortunately his boss¬†overheard them talking for about 12 minutes before James realized he had pocket dialed his boss. He hung up immediately. However, it was too late.¬†The next day Stephens was forced to resign his six-figure job.

The¬† Stephenses have sued James’s boss personally, claiming he had invaded their right to privacy with “voyeuristic eavesdropping (that was) felonious conduct,” However, they face an uphill battle. One legal analyst opined,¬†“What we find here is someone who really believed he had a reasonable expectation of privacy in having a very, very confidential conversation with his wife and that yet, it may not be private at all.”

Centuries before any telephone existed, James wrote about the untamable nature of the tongue.¬†“For every kind of beast and bird, or reptile and sea creature, can be tamed and has been tamed by mankind, but no human being can tame the tongue. It is a restless evil, full of deadly poison. With it we bless our Lord and Father, and with it we curse people who are made in the likeness of God. From the same mouth come blessing and cursing. My brothers, these things ought not to be so”¬†(James 3:7-10).

The tongue is hard to tame, be careful in our communication, what’s done in private can be revealed in public.

 

Firefighters in the Los Angeles Fire Department found a creative way to find and rescue a lost teenager. When thirteen-year-old Jesse Hernandez plunged 25 feet into a four-foot-wide sewer pipe after walking on some wooden planks in an abandoned building, rescuers turned to a superhero-inspired solution to help locate the young boy. rescue

The search, which lasted 13 hours, was a race against time as survivability diminishes in that toxic environment according to Erik Scott with the Los Angeles Fire Department (LAFD). More than 100 firefighters searched 2,400 feet of pipe in a maze of a sewer system that has different depths of water moving at around 15 miles per hour.

Since the hazardous environment prevented crews from wading in directly, firefighters strapped a camera to a flotation device, and used its signal along with other “Batman-like tools” to track the boy’s location, identifying the handprints he left on the pipe walls along the way.

Rescuers found Hernandez a mile east of where he accidentally entered the sewer pipe. After the rescue, LAFD personnel gave him a cell phone to call his parents, obviously quite relieved.

I love that the LAFD found a creative way to find and rescue Hernandez. But I am forever grateful that the Creator of the Universe sent His one and only Son into the hazardous environment of our sin-filled world. Through the life, death, resurrection, and saving power of Jesus Christ, we can be rescued forever.

This past Saturday I preached Mrs. Edna’s funeral. She had lived more than ninety years on the earth, although she actually fell a little less than a decade of her goal. I noted at the funeral that everyone of us had our “Edna stories” that were actually our own precious treasures. Rather than rehearsing a few of those choice stories, I urged those in attendance to treasure the hidden anecdotes that we had hidden in our memories.

Edna knew the Lord, and at life’s end, that’s all that really matters. It’s not about accumulating wealth, titles, properties, or fame. It’s what a person did with Jesus that matters. Edna had trusted Christ in life, and she had trusted Him in death.

The sorrow we felt at Edna’s funeral was not hers. No, the sorrow we felt was ours. We lost a friend who had made us laugh and cry. She was someone we enjoyed and sometimes just put up with!

The apostle Paul wrote these words to the church in Corinth: For we know that if the tent that is our earthly home is destroyed, we have a building from God, a house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens” (2 Corinthians 5:1, ESV). The word “know” in this verse means “assurance borne out of conviction,” so Paul knew beyond a shadow of a doubt that death did not signal the end of a person’s existence. He used the word “tent” as a synonym for our earthly existence or life, calling it “our earthly home.” In contrast to “tent,” Paul said that “we have a building from God, a house not made with hands.”

We would do well to remember that when Jesus left His rightful place in heaven that the apostle John describe it as “the Word became flesh and dwelt among us” (John 1:14, ESV). John’s word for dwell literally means “to pitch a tent” or “to tabernacle.” In other words, when Christ came to the earth, He lived as a human being — “He pitched His tent among us.” When He had accomplished His mission on earth — His death, burial, and resurrection — He returned to His Father in heaven.

Scientists tell us that the cells in the human body continually die and replenish so that every seven years we get an entirely new body. That means that Edna had lived in several bodies! We did not weep for her when she moved from the first to the second or imagesthe fifth or the sixth or even the twelfth! Why should we weep now when she moved from her earthly tent into the wonderful house that the Lord has prepared for her?

 

Paul said that when this old earthly tent is worn out and is no longer fit for habitation, we move into “a building from God, a house not made with hands.”¬†A building has a foundation, suggesting a permanent house and not a tent. This new house is an eternal dwelling place.

Edna lived in several places since I’ve known her. Some of them were nicer than others. But now, Edna has moved again! And we should be happy for her! Let me offer some more words of encouragement from Paul,¬†“So we are always of good courage. We know that while we are at home in the body we are away from the Lord….Yes, we are of good courage, and we would rather be away from the body and at home with the Lord” (2 Corinthians 5:6,8, ESV). Note the words “away from the body and at home with the Lord.” There’s no in between time.

Death is a part of life just as much as birth is a part of life. Let’s just suppose for a moment that Edna could have reasoned in her prenatal state. “Something is about to happen to me. I’m about to leave the only place I’ve ever known. It’s good in here. I’m safe. I’m well-nourished. I’m going somewhere I’ve never been. This must be death.” When the reality is that she discovered birth, not death. She left the narrow confines of her mother’s womb to discover a far greater and richer life.

In the same vein, let’s suppose that a few hours before Edna underwent another change on Tuesday afternoon. Again she reasoned, “Something is about to happen to me. I am about to leave the only place of life I have ever known. Surely this must be death.”

But if Edna could speak to us, she would undoubtedly say, “No, I was wrong again. What I thought was death was another birth out of the human flesh experience to the superlative life of heaven. It’s far greater and richer than I could have ever imagined.

At a June 13, 2008, event honoring John Wooden and famed sportscaster Vin Scully and raising money for pediatric cancer research at UCLA and other local institutions, Coach Wooden had an opportunity to demonstrate his famed socks-and-shoes lessons.

Wooden began the first day of practice each year with his most important basketball lesson. Players gathering for that first day  were full of anticipation. They wondered how their coach would set the tone for the long season to come. They didn’t have to wait long. Socks

At the event one of Wooden’s most famous players, Bill Walton, introduced the coach and recalled his first days at UCLA as a basketball player. Walton related the shock that he and other new players felt when the first thing Wooden did was set them down and teach them how to put on their shoes and socks. Doing this properly, Walton said, was the initial lesson for “everything we would need to know for the rest of our lives.”

Following Walton’s introduction, Coach Wooden came out on stage holding a box with athletic shoes and socks, bringing with him 12-year-old Robert, who was introduced as having tackled cancer at Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA. There was much good-natured laughter as Wooden gave Robert the socks-and-shoes instructions.

“You know, basketball is a game that’s played on a hardwood floor,” Wooden said. “And to be good, you have to…change your direction, change your pace. That’s hard on your feet. Your feet are very important.”

The team veterans knew this lesson was coming at the first practice, but  first year players were no doubt perplexed by the initial lesson imparted by their Hall of Fame coach: He taught them how to put on a pair of socks. He did not teach this lesson only once, but before every game and practice. Why?

Wooden had discovered many players didn‚Äôt properly smooth out wrinkles in the socks around their heels and little toes. If left uncorrected, these wrinkles could cause blisters that could hamper their performance at crucial times during games. Many players thought the practice odd and laughed about it then. Wooden knows some of them still laugh about it today. But the coach would not compromise on this basic fundamental principle: ‚ÄúI stuck to it. I believed in that, and I insisted on it.‚ÄĚ

In our desire to grow as Christians, we can easily forget about the fundamentals of our faith. If we do, we run the risk of developing painful spiritual blisters that can hurt us as we run our race.