Archive for the ‘Purpose’ Category

1 cor. 9.22.001Recently I posted about purchasing a couple of tickets to a baseball game for my wife and me to attend. Our local AAA baseball team had partnered with a semiprofessional football in our area for a one-night promotional event through which the Bayou Lacombe Cardinals football team would receive a portion of the proceeds. I also happen to work with the team as their public address announcer.

I had no idea that my post — meant to urge others to purchase tickets to support the football team — would be controversial. Because I am also a pastor, my association with the team was questioned, and I offered an immediate straightforward answer: “I’m building relationships with people who need the gospel.” Somehow this led to a charge that my “popularity” has to do with my willingness to please people and to conform to their ways. The charge continued to what must have been the aim of the original question, which was to disparage the use of contemporary music in churches.

Okay, I’ll admit it. I enjoy contemporary music. But I also enjoy the sacred hymns. However, I also enjoy many other styles of music. When asked “What kind of music do I want the church to use?” I always respond, “Music that honors God and that is done well and that relates to the people. I define “done well” as that which is presented as the best the particular congregation, singers, or instrumentalists can offer because we ought always offer our best when it comes to worshiping the Lord.”

Throughout my ministry I have pursued a variety of interests in order to connect with people in the community. The goal has always been the same — to build relationships with people who need the gospel. The apostle Paul modeled this (cf. 1 Corinthians 9:19-23). Paul clearly stated his purpose for conforming to the customs and opinions of men by stating “I have become all things to all people, so that I may by every possible means save some” (1 Cor. 9:22). What mattered to Paul was not him, his rights, or his preferences, but the gospel. The gospel consumed his life.

The controversy surrounding “contemporary music” hardly smacks of something new. In 1873 (that’s more than 150 years ago!), something new came on the scene when the great preacher D.L. Moody’s singing associate, Ira D. Sankey, introduced what became known as the “singing of the gospel.” Sankey’s style completely revolutionized the music of the church.

Before Sankey, a cappella singing of the psalms and hymns and spiritual songs had always been an important part of worship services. However, Sankey introduced a style of popular hymn calculated to awaken the careless, to melt the hardened, and to guide the inquiring souls to the Lord Jesus Christ. Often when the Moody-Sankey team came to town for an evangelistic campaign, the people would come out of curiosity to see and hear Sankey sing. Pedaling his small cabinet organ, he would sing out in his rich, melodious voice, and completely captivate his audience. During this time many church members thought that the use of an organ or any kind of musical instrument to accompany the voices of singers was wicked and worldly. Strict church people, accustomed only to the unaccompanied old psalm-singing type of church music called Sankey’s songs “human hymns.” It took tact on the part of Sankey to break down the prejudice against organ music. He helped transition the practice and the result was a wave of well-composed and great theologically sound hymns which are still sung in churches today.

I believe that each generation needs its Ira Sankeys who can tactfully make the theology of Scripture speak to the people. People often say that the older hymns have such theological value and that we should be teaching their value and not have them lost. If by teaching the value of hymns, you mean that we should sing songs that have robust theological meaning, I wholeheartedly agree. If you mean that we need to teach a particular style of music, that’s actually missing the point. People are converted to Christ through the gospel not through a style of music.

What matters is the theological truth that comes from Scripture. Words are what matters — not the melodies or tunes or even the instruments. We should sing truth. We can sing truth with new songs and new instruments, and we can sing truth with old songs and new instruments and new arrangements.

It comes down to getting the saving message of the gospel to people. I cannot win everyone, but I’m willing to do whatever is biblically permissible to win some. And I’m willing to rub elbows with anyone if it means that I might have the opportunity to speak the gospel.

 

 

 

 

Solomon had much to say about worldly treasure. Here are a few verses from Ecclesiastes:  

The one who loves silver is never satisfied with silver, and whoever loves wealth is never satisfied with income. This too is futile. 11 When good things increase, the ones who consume them multiply; what, then, is the profit to the owner, except to gaze at them with his eyes? 12 The sleep of the worker is sweet, whether he eats little or much, but the abundance of the rich permits him no sleep (Ecclesiastes 5:10-12, CSB).

 

People are continually searching for the treasure of true life and joy and love. Jesus Christ promised that He was that treasure. Any other treasure will lead you astray. This still doesn’t stop people from searching in the wrong places for what they believe will bring them joy.

Somewhere in the Rocky Mountains, there’s a bronze chest filled with gold and precious gems. The search for this hidden treasure has become a hobby for some, an obsession for others, and for one recent searcher — a fatal pursuit.

Last summer, 53-year-old Jeff Murphy was hiking in Yellowstone National Park when he disappeared. Park investigators found his body on June 9, where Murphy had fallen 500 feet from Turkey Pen Peak, after accidentally stepping into a chute.

The man behind the treasure is Forrest Fenn, an 86-year-old millionaire, former Vietnam fighter pilot, self-taught archaeologist, and successful art dealer in Santa Fe, New Mexico. “No one knows where that treasure chest is but me,” Fenn says. “If I die tomorrow, the knowledge of that location goes in the coffin with me.”

“The ornate, Romanesque box is 10-by-10 inches and weighs about 40 pounds when loaded,” NPR’s John Burnett reported in 2016. “Fenn has only revealed that it is hidden in the Rocky Mountains, somewhere between Santa Fe and the Canadian border at an elevation above 5,000 feet. It’s not in a mine, a graveyard, or near a structure.” For further clues, you have to read the poem in his self-published book, The Thrill of the Chase.

Here’s one stanza:

Begin it where warm waters halt

And take it in the canyon down,

Not far, but too far to walk.

Put in below the home of Brown.

So far tens of thousands of people have reportedly gone looking for Fenn’s treasure, thought to be worth well over a million dollars. Murphy is the fourth man to die while searching for the chest.

Solomon concluded Ecclesiastes 5 with a word towards focusing on God who brings us satisfying joy:

Here is what I have seen to be good: It is appropriate to eat, drink, and experience good in all the labor one does under the sun during the few days of his life God has given him, because that is his reward. 19 Furthermore, everyone to whom God has given riches and wealth, he has also allowed him to enjoy them, take his reward, and rejoice in his labor. This is a gift of God, 20 for he does not often consider the days of his life because God keeps him occupied with the joy of his heart (Ecclesiastes 5:18-20, CSB).

Why not spend your efforts finding and enjoying the real treasure found in a relationship with Jesus Christ?

God has a purpose for every human life. Whether a person has mental health challenges (according to research one out of four Americans has some sort of challenge) or whether a person is completely healthy in every way, every person has a God-given purpose. Human life is not in the hands of human beings but in the hands of God.

During my time of “in between assignments,” I have been preparing to preach each week. As those who have known me or have followed my ministry, you know that I preach mostly in series and most of the series take on books of the Bible or portions of a book of the Bible. For December, I am preparing messages from the first two chapters of Luke. This week I have prepared a message from Luke 1:57-80 which describes the birth of John the Baptist. This passage emphasizes how God keeps His promises made to His people. The details about the naming of the baby born to Elizabeth and Zechariah indicate how he was destined for a significant ministry in service of God.Zechariah

Previously, Gabriel had appeared to Zechariah while he ministered in the temple. He delivered the message from God that Zechariah and Elizabeth would have a son. Because of their advanced ages, Zechariah questioned how this could happen and essentially asked for a sign. The Lord shut Zechariah’s mouth as a result of his faithlessness.

Since Elizabeth had hidden herself and Zechariah was mute, the news of the birth of this promised baby came as a sudden surprise for the neighbors and kin. They reacted with rejoicing and celebration. On the eighth day when the baby was circumcised, the people called the baby Zechariah, following the tradition of the day. But Elizabeth firmly declared, “No, he shall be called John.” When the crowd objected the name, they turned to Zechariah and made signs to him to see how he reacted to this name. Still speechless, Zechariah wrote “John” on a tablet. The people marveled at his agreement with Elizabeth and in the firmness of his reply.

As he expressed his agreement with Elizabeth, Zechariah regained his voice. With his first words, he offered praise to God. The people had witnessed the powerful moving of God and they were afraid. They asked, “What then will this child be?”

Zechariah moved dead silence to praise. Luke characterized his speech as prophecy which is always directed to others, not God. It served as guidance for those gathered for the circumcision ceremony, and it sheds light for us today concerning the Messiah. Zechariah answered more than the people’s question and went on to declare what this child’s birth revealed about God’s faithfulness to the promises made to Abraham and David. He also declared that it signaled the advent of the Messiah to deliver Israel.

This Messiah would be the Redeemer of all people, the mighty and victorious King, and the Savior of the world, the Lamb of God who would remove the debt of sin on the cross. The Messiah would also be the Light of the world who would rise up in the darkness and be the light of the world. He would be the Prince of Peace. The Messiah would be the fulfillment of Isaiah’s prophecy of Isaiah 9:6.

God has a divine plan for your life. Do not minimize it. God has you here for a purpose. You are a part of God’s plan. Ultimately, God wants you to find your purpose through Jesus Christ.