Archive for January, 2018

In an interview with Cindy Pearlman published in The Chicago Sun Times (October 13, 2014), actor Bill Murray claimed that a work of art once saved his life. He was in Chicago for his first experience as an actor. He thought that his first performance had gone so badly that he just walked out afterward and onto the street. He kept walking for a couple of hours. Then he realized that he walked in the wrong direction and not in just the wrong direction from where he lived, but in the desire to stay alive.

He headed for Lake Michigan as he contemplated taking his own life. Murray continued:

“I thought: ‘If I’m going to die, I might as well go over toward the lake and float a bit.’ So, I walked toward the lake and reached Michigan Avenue and started walking north. Somehow I ended up in front of the Art Institute and walked inside. the-song-of-the-lark-1884.jpg!LargeThere was a painting of a woman working in a field with a sunrise behind her. I always loved that painting. I saw it that night and said, ‘Look, there’s a girl without a whole lot of prospects, but the sun’s coming up and she’s got another chance at it.'”

The painting, “Song of a Lark” by Jules Breton, helped mend Murray’s heart. After gazing at the painting, Murray decided to live and said, “I’m a person, too, and will get another chance every single day.”

When Peter addressed “the exiles dispersed abroad” throughout five Roman provinces (see 1 Peter 1:1), he wrote to encourage them as they faced uncertainty due to persecution. Having been forced to leave their homes, their jobs, their friends, their way of life, these believers needed exactly what Peter offered — encouragement to remain faithful and strong in the Lord.

That encouragement remains intact for believers today! God has given each believer a new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. This new birth comes with an inheritance that is untouched by death, unstained by evil, and unimpaired by time. Furthermore what God has given to the believer is being guarded by God’s power. Not only that, but the fullness of our eternal salvation is ready now to be revealed when He returns (see 1 Peter 3-5).

You have every reason to live for today because God has your today and forever covered.

 

Anyone who knows me well also knows that I was not the best science student. In fact, because of my limited grasp on textbook science, I managed to earn an undergraduate degree with only one science course! However, this has not kept me from appreciating the connections from science when I study God’s Word.

I’m hoping to continue preaching as many Sundays as possible while I am in this “in between” ministries phase. So each week I prepare as if I will be preaching. It keeps me sharp and focused on my calling as a pastor-teacher. The Lord has led me to prepare to preach from 1 Peter, and I discovered a great connection between science and the audience Peter addressed.

Dr. James Clark, is a professor of Geology at Wheaton College in Chicago. He recounted a visit to the Soviet Union a few years after Communism dissolved. Though not a preacher, Dr. Clark was asked to preach at a small Russian Baptist church that lived through a long season of persecution. Some in the congregation had been in prison because of their testimony in Christ. Others had husbands or relatives that had suffered or had even been killed for their faith.

In order to connect with his audience, Dr. Clark decided to use a geological illustration — one dealing with metamorphic rocks. Clark said: 

“Clay is actually composed of many microscopic clay mineral crystals, which not even a light microscope can see. But under pressure the clay minerals are not crushed or made smaller. Rather, they grow larger. The minerals change into new larger biotype grains forming slate, found on many homes. With even more pressure, the minerals become even larger. And some are transformed into garnets, which are semi-precious gems.”slate

Dr. Clark explained to the congregation that this geological process illustrates how pressure and suffering can be used to refine, purify, and mold a person into a more beautiful soul. He said that he will never forget what he saw when he looked at the congregation. It seemed like the whole congregation was sparkling. The old women’s eyes were gleaming bright with tears recalling past suffering.

stauroliteDr. Clark continued, “What makes a gem so attractive? It’s the reflection. These dear women and men were reflecting God’s glory through the suffering they had endured. But there’s more: With even more pressure applied, a new mineral forms called staurolite. The name is from two Greek words meaning “stone cross.” The twin variety forms deep under high mountains in the shape of a cross. A reminder of Christ’s ultimate suffering for us all.”

Peter wrote his epistle for two clear reasons. First, Peter wanted to challenge and strengthen believers to stand against the onslaught of persecution being leveled against them. Peter also wanted to reinforce the truth that believers have an eternal home and that we are merely passing through this time on the earth. Peter’s audience was hurting and suffering from ridicule and persecution. They had been forced to leave everything behind: homes, property, estates, businesses, jobs, money, church, friends, and fellow believers. Now scattered to five Roman provinces, Peter urged them to continue as an underground church.

Imagine the fear, uncertainty, and insecurity. They lived each day looking over their shoulders. Their stress-filled lives included restlessness, sleeplessness, anxiety, uncertainty, and insecurity. Their hearts pounded at the slightest shadow or noise.

These believers needed strong encouragement. Peter’s words would have helped them immensely to know that God had not forgotten them but was bringing about a strengthening of their faith in Christ.