Unthinkable Tragedy

Posted: April 22, 2016 in Church, Evangelism, Family, Pastoral Ministry, Tragedy
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Most every week I pray with each of the three high school principals in Mandeville. I have a standing appointment on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at the Fontainebleau, Lakeshore, and Mandeville. During these times of prayer, I listen to each of these men as they talk about their students and faculty. We often talk about our church and how things are going. At the end our brief time together, I will pray for the principal, the students, the faculty, and any specific prayer request that has been voiced.

This week was different. Having already heard about a Mandeville High School student who had taken his life on Monday, I received a text message early Thursday morning informing me that a second student from the school had taken his life. While it’s not unusual to have a difficult time finding a place to park at the school, I decided to park in a “staff only” space. As I approached the school’s administrative offices, I walked past more than a half dozen police officers. Once inside, I waited for a while as the office staff answered the phone, taking time to address concerns raised.  Grief counselors had been summoned. A couple of student assemblies had been planned.

While I did not get to pray with the principal, I did pray for him and his staff and students as I left the campus. Without a doubt, this would be a difficult day and week for the school. The families affected by these tragedies need our prayers and our comfort. The hurt is deep. The anxiety caused by these losses can be devastating.

What can you do? Pray. Then pray some more. If you are close to the family, then do not stay away. If you are not close to the family, it is probably better to pray from a distance. The truest friends are those who wait. This loss is so unexplainable, so difficult to grasp. You need to wait for the griever to grieve. Don’t pressure them to “get back to normal.” Their normal has been rocked. Embrace them with love. Don’t try to offer answers. Eventually, you can point them to the hope and joy and victory that can only be found in Christ.

In March of 2014, a year after the devastating loss of his twenty-seven-year-old son who took his own life, Pastor Rick Warren of Saddleback Church was asked, “How have you made it? How have you kept going in your pain?” His answer? “Easter.” Warren went on, “You see, the death and the burial and the resurrection of Jesus happened over three days. Friday was the day of suffering and pain and agony. Saturday was the day of doubt and confusion and misery. But Easter—that Sunday—was the day of hope and joy and victory. And here’s the fact of life: you will face these three days over and over and over in your lifetime. And when you do, you’ll find yourself asking—as I did—three fundamental questions. Number one, ‘What do I do in my days of pain?’ Number two, ‘How do I get through my days of doubt and confusion?’ Number three, ‘How do I get to the days of joy and victory?’”

The answer is Easter!

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Comments
  1. Lynn Elam Bonge says:

    We love your heart, Pastor Ken! Thank you for being so available to all of us!

  2. Cheryl Robinson says:

    Beautifully said, Ken! I am so thankful to have you as my pastor. I’m thrilled to hear that you are praying with each high school principal in our community on a weekly basis. What an asset to those schools and to our whole community!
    I have been praying for the loved ones of these two students also, and will continue praying. I pray for you and your family, too, as you minister at every level.
    Thank you for your consistent leadership and for your heart for outreach to our community.
    God bless you!

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